Why don't you look for masterpieces of craftsmanship that remain today by repeating time and skill

  • Miyajima Shakko with a history of over 200 years
  • Miyajima-yaki, which is said to have started when a ritual vessel was made by putting sand from the Imperial Highness of Itsukushima Shrine
  • Papier mache, which is also popular as a lucky charm
  • Miyajima carving handed down from the Edo period
  • The Kumano brush that conveys tradition to the present
  • Bingo-kan boasting a tradition of nearly 170 years
  • Onomichi canvas attracting attention as a fashion accessory
  • Miyajima Shakko with a history of over 200 years
  • Miyajima-yaki, which is said to have started when a ritual vessel was made by putting sand from the Imperial Highness of Itsukushima Shrine
  • Papier mache, which is also popular as a lucky charm
  • Miyajima carving handed down from the Edo period
  • The Kumano brush that conveys tradition to the present
  • Bingo-kan boasting a tradition of nearly 170 years
  • Onomichi canvas attracting attention as a fashion accessory

Hiroshima has traditional techniques nurtured by history and climate. Thoughts embedded in one, one by one, handiwork. From practical items to ornaments, craftsmanship shines in a variety of things.

Traditional crafts from Miyajima

I absolutely want it! A great staple of Miyajima souvenirs

Miyajima’s Omotesando shopping street is lined with attractive traditional crafts. Folk crafts such as Miyajima shakushi, rokurozaiku, wooden spoon, Miyajima carving, kakubon, Miyajima ware, and papier-mâché are lined up in shops.

Miyajima Shakuko

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Miyajima Shakushi has a history of more than 200 years. It boasts the highest production volume in Japan, and is also loved by the nickname “Miyajima-san” from Tohoku to the north. It is not only a practical item, but it is also useful as a lucky souvenir because of the meaning of “getting happiness”.

Miyajima-yaki (sand grilled)

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“Miyajima-yaki” is said to have started when a ritual vessel was made by putting sand from Itsukushima Shrine. It is also called “sunayaki,” and it seems that many people ask for tea utensils and flower vases as souvenirs when visiting Miyajima. The technology has been inherited from the three potteries in Miyajimaguchi.

Papier mache

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Miyajima papier-mâché has many motifs of animals and traditional events, and features colorful colors. The facial expressions of papier-mâché are slightly different one by one, and you will be healed just by looking at them. Choose your favorite papier-mâché carefully.

Miyajima carving

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Miyajima carving has been handed down to the island since the Edo period, and the technique of electric light is used abundantly. The scenery of the island in each season is carved into a tray and a ladle. The dynamic carving is worth seeing.

“Kumano brushes” famous for makeup brushes

Makeup brushes with a reputation for high quality
There are many brushes
Numerous exhibits that give you a sense of history
There are also many high-end brushes!

Made one by one by craftsmen who inherit the tradition of 170 years

Kumano brushes began to be manufactured at the end of the Edo period. The nationwide share of brushes, painting brushes, and makeup brushes is more than 80%, especially makeup brushes are used by makeup artists around the world, and they have a reputation for their high quality. There are several shops in Hiroshima that specialize in Kumano brushes, so why don’t you find one you like while trying it out directly on your skin.

The tradition of handicrafts comes alive in the textile town

The quality of textiles handed down as a tradition

Today, “Bingo-kan” and “Onomichi Hanpu” have been transformed into various fashion accessories and are attracting attention. Handmade shops and handicraft workshops also support custom-made products, so it is recommended that you order “one thing in the world” to commemorate your trip.

“Bingo-kan,” which boasts a long tradition

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It is said that it is one of the three major kasuri lines in line with Kurume Kasuri and Iyo-kasuri, and “Bingo Kasuri” boasts a tradition of nearly 170 years.

“Onomichi Hanpu” with its simple texture and strength

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“Onomichi hanpu” was used as a cloth for sailboats because it was a port of call for Kitamae-bune.

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